Hi there, I'm Rachel. I'm 22. I have a bachelor's degree in computer science and math and I'm hella nerdy. I'm probably the biggest Avatar fan you will ever meet. I blog about my life, Avatar, Dragonlance, books, Jewish things, vegetarian things, and super cute animals (especially bunnies!) I love making new friends, so please message me if you want to talk! ^_^

wenevergotusedtoegypt:

chaobunny:

Some random thoughts about Jewish stuff under the cut, mostly me rambling about trying to reconcile reading stuff that is troubling in religious text with my own values and stuff.

Disclaimer: I approach this from a modern and rather secular perspective and I don’t claim to have any deep knowledge or understanding of the text, just my own thoughts.

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I’m of the “G-d said so” camp so we won’t be able to come to a real agreement, but I just wanted to throw in a couple things.

Animal sacrifices were never instead of teshuva and prayer and fasting. We were always obligated in those as well - the sacrifice was an extra step, which, as your friend said, is technically still needed, we just can’t do it right now.

The difference between animal sacrifices and polygamy/slavery is that the Torah allows a man to have multiple wives and allows slaves (though it makes the latter pretty difficult and not nearly as profitable as non-Torah slavery, thus arguably purposely making it unappealing), but there is nothing anywhere that says people have to do those things. Thus when people stopped having slaves and when Rabbeinu Gershom made a decree against polygamy a thousand years or so ago, people weren’t not following the Torah, they were just no longer taking up an option the Torah gave them. In contrast, we’re aren’t allowed to bring sacrifices, we are obligated to bring them (well, some are voluntary, but many are not). So no simple human decree could abrogate that requirement. It’s a very different situation than the other two things.

The argument that G-d doesn’t “need” sacrifices because He’s all-powerful doesn’t hold water, because that’s just it - G-d is all-powerful. And as the Creator, He defines how the world works and what is right and what is wrong. G-d doesn’t need ANYTHING, not sacrifices, not fasting, not prayer, not even Creation itself. G-d chose to create a world in which sacrifices operate on some spiritual level to cleanse people of sin. He could have made it a different way, but that’s not what He did. 

What it comes down to is whether you believe the Torah is from G-d - if yes, it’s impossible to say that animal sacrifices are wrong and barbaric in our times, since it is specifically stipulated in the Torah that all the mitzvos - including sacrifices - are an eternal decree. Either they really are eternal, G-d was lying, or G-d isn’t omniscient and is bound by time and so didn’t know sacrifices would become outmoded. Neither of the latter two options seem viable to me. 

With respect I don’t agree with most of what you said, but thank you for your input and logically from the perspective you are coming from it does make sense. I’m approaching this from the perspective that the Torah was divinely inspired but was compiled over time by human beings and thus in many ways is a product of the time period in which it was written because human beings are flawed and can’t see into the future like an eternal being can. Because honestly that’s the only way I can reconcile things that I perceive to be highly problematic in the text and still connect to it.

I still stand by the fact that there are still plenty of things that aren’t done anymore and that this is proof that traditions change but faith doesn’t have to. We no longer are required to kill people for turning away from the faith because that’s ridiculous. While I definitely agree that the ideas in the text are eternal, I don’t at all believe that the practices have to be because how people connect spiritually is going to be different over the span of time because the world is not a stagnant place.

But anyway even if what you said holds true I still am not at all understanding of the idea how killing an innocent animal could in any way cleanse a person of sin because the only one suffering is the animal who has committed no sin. That’s the main part of this that troubles me. The fact that this can even have at one point been considered to be a spiritual practice really freaks me out. Aren’t we supposed to question stuff like this?

Some random thoughts about Jewish stuff under the cut, mostly me rambling about trying to reconcile reading stuff that is troubling in religious text with my own values and stuff.

Disclaimer: I approach this from a modern and rather secular perspective and I don’t claim to have any deep knowledge or understanding of the text, just my own thoughts.

Read More

If I’ve ever done anything to offend or hurt anyone, I’d like to take this opportunity to apologize. I know I have made a lot of mistakes and I’m going to try and do better.

If anyone wants a personal apology, please send me an ask or private message. I want to work hard to be the best person I can be!

Good yontif and have an easy fast.

Only 40 more minutes until I get to eat…wow I can’t believe I made it the whole day
For those of my followers observing Yom Kippur, have an easy fast