Hi there, I'm Rachel. I'm 22. I have a bachelor's degree in computer science and math and I'm hella nerdy. I'm probably the biggest Avatar fan you will ever meet. I blog about my life, Avatar, Dragonlance, books, Jewish things, vegetarian things, and super cute animals (especially bunnies!) I love making new friends, so please message me if you want to talk! ^_^

transmootation-circle:

treat yourself like edward elric would treat you if you told him he was tall

shadowrawrs:

strawberrydaydreams:

do you ever hate someone so much but you don’t even have a valid reason

you’re just like

no

And then they give you a reason and its like

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hinokit:

Hair ruffling <3andignoreheightdifferenceletsjustsaymakoisbendinghiskneesyesss 

hinokit:

Hair ruffling <3
andignoreheightdifferenceletsjustsaymakoisbendinghiskneesyesss 

writingwithiron:

floating-head:

levis-dildo:

phantomhivefanatic:

suber:

If you watch anime click play I won’t ruin it for you.

I WAS NOT PREPARED!!!

HOLY SHIT WHAT WAS THAT

god damn it

i fucking knew it

invocative:

I’m going to express all my emotions this way from now on.

wilwheaton:

(via xkcd: Beliefs)

wilwheaton:

(via xkcd: Beliefs)

humansofnewyork:

"I think the great fear of every Tibetan is that our story will die out. It’s been over fifty years now since Tibet lost its independence. Our monasteries have been destroyed. The Chinese language curriculum is being mandated in our schools. More and more Han Chinese are moving into Tibet— building homes, building malls. I think now we are all starting to think that the Chinese are too powerful and that the dream of returning home is fading away. I think our mistake was that we didn’t keep up with the world. We held on to the monastic tradition too tightly. We didn’t embrace modern education, and so we weren’t connected with the outside world. Because of that, we lost our freedom silently. I think our challenge now is to educate our children in a modern way, so hopefully they will be better at sharing our story."
(Dharamshala, India)

humansofnewyork:

"I think the great fear of every Tibetan is that our story will die out. It’s been over fifty years now since Tibet lost its independence. Our monasteries have been destroyed. The Chinese language curriculum is being mandated in our schools. More and more Han Chinese are moving into Tibet— building homes, building malls. I think now we are all starting to think that the Chinese are too powerful and that the dream of returning home is fading away. I think our mistake was that we didn’t keep up with the world. We held on to the monastic tradition too tightly. We didn’t embrace modern education, and so we weren’t connected with the outside world. Because of that, we lost our freedom silently. I think our challenge now is to educate our children in a modern way, so hopefully they will be better at sharing our story."

(Dharamshala, India)

ikkinthekitsune:

Here’s something I haven’t seen mentioned before — look at Korra’s eyes.
No, really look at them.  The differences are honestly pretty subtle.  But, if you look closely at Book 2 and Book 4 Korra side by side, you’ll probably start to notice that there’s something different about them in the newest promotional image.
It took me a while to figure out what the difference was, but once I figured it out, it became a lot more obvious.  The proportions of Korra’s face are different.  Her eyes are set wider apart, and they’re smaller and a bit colder.  She looks hardened and less childlike; her face looks narrower and less rounded, too.
Bryke mentioned, back when they introduced Korra’s Book 2 outfit, that it was designed to look a bit “meaner” than her normal clothes.  I suspect that has a lot to do with why it’s back.  Her posture seems a bit less heroic, too — instead of her usual open confidence, she’s tense and guarded, looking ready to pounce without mercy.
I wonder whether the Korra we see in Book 4 might be lose some of the restraint she showed in Book 3 as she tries to differentiate herself from the (peaceful and diplomatic) Air Nation.  If the Air Nation is there to preserve stability, than maybe the purpose of the Avatar ought to be the disruption of unbalanced systems to foster controlled change.  Of course, that would require a pretty ruthless Avatar!

ikkinthekitsune:

Here’s something I haven’t seen mentioned before — look at Korra’s eyes.

No, really look at them.  The differences are honestly pretty subtle.  But, if you look closely at Book 2 and Book 4 Korra side by side, you’ll probably start to notice that there’s something different about them in the newest promotional image.

It took me a while to figure out what the difference was, but once I figured it out, it became a lot more obvious.  The proportions of Korra’s face are different.  Her eyes are set wider apart, and they’re smaller and a bit colder.  She looks hardened and less childlike; her face looks narrower and less rounded, too.

Bryke mentioned, back when they introduced Korra’s Book 2 outfit, that it was designed to look a bit “meaner” than her normal clothes.  I suspect that has a lot to do with why it’s back.  Her posture seems a bit less heroic, too — instead of her usual open confidence, she’s tense and guarded, looking ready to pounce without mercy.

I wonder whether the Korra we see in Book 4 might be lose some of the restraint she showed in Book 3 as she tries to differentiate herself from the (peaceful and diplomatic) Air Nation.  If the Air Nation is there to preserve stability, than maybe the purpose of the Avatar ought to be the disruption of unbalanced systems to foster controlled change.  Of course, that would require a pretty ruthless Avatar!

The World’s Most Wonderful Bookstores!

thepersonificationofperfection:

Poplar Kid’s Republic

Beijing

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Livraria Lello

Porto, Portugal

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Shakespeare & Co. Antiquarian Books

Paris

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El Péndulo

Mexico City

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Selexyz Bookstore

Maastricht, Holland

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Cook and Book

Brussels, Belgium

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El Ateneo Grand Splendid

Buenos Aires, Argentina

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Ler Devagar

Lisbon, Portugal

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thecutestofthecute:

In honor of Autumn coming soon, here are some happy dogs that love the fall weather are aren’t afraid to show it. Have a great day everyone.

asexualityresources:

Because nobody deserves to feel alone.

asexualityresources:

Because nobody deserves to feel alone.

exfatalist:

trekual-innuendos:

Lets have a dystopian future movie where none of the actors are white

Not a single one

No reason

No explanation

There’s just no white people and not a single character questions it

Watch how quickly people notice and get pissed off

but wouldn’t it be better to put one white extra in the far background of a huge crowd shot for a few frames, so we could point to them every time someone gets pissed off?

captainofalltheships:

Chrys watches GoT [x]

nosdrinker:

i don’t know what these are but i love them

archiemcphee:

Check out the awesomely long tails on these roosters! These regal specimens are Onagadori or “Long-tailed” chickens. They’re a breed of chicken from the Kōchi Prefecture of Japan who evolved from common domestic chickens who mated with Green Junglefowl. Also known as the ‘most honorable fowl’ in Japan, they’ve been carefully bred over the centuries to achieve their spectacular tails, which grow to lengths of 12 to 27 feet. It takes these chickens at least three years to molt. Onagadori breeders take tremendous pride in their chickens and provide special hutches with perches well above the ground, which helps keep their tails clean and in good condition.

If Rapunzel had been a chicken, she probably would’ve looked a lot like one of these awesome birds. These extraordinarily fancy fowl have Special Natural Monument status in Japan, which means they’re considered to be living monuments of Japanese culture and, as a protected breed, it’s illegal to take their eggs out of the country.

[via Lost At E Minor and Wikipedia]